Tag: Absent the tax benefits

Canada vs Bank of Montreal, September 2018, Tax Court of Canada, Case No 2018 TCC 187

Canada vs Bank of Montreal, September 2018, Tax Court of Canada, Case No 2018 TCC 187

The Court found that section 245 (GAAR) of the Canadian Income Tax Act did not apply to the transactions in question. Subsection 245(1) defines a “tax benefit” as a reduction, avoidance or deferral of tax. The Respondent says that the tax benefit BMO received was the reduction in its tax payable as a result of subsection 112(3.1) not applying to reduce its share of the capital loss on the disposition of the common shares of NSULC. In 2005, the Bank of Montreal (“BMO”) wanted to lend a total of $1.4 billion USD to a number of its US subsidiaries referred to as the Harris Group. BMO chose to borrow those funds from third parties. Tower Structure It would not have been tax efficient for BMO to simply borrow the funds and lend them to the Harris Group. Such a structure would have resulted in BMO having to pay US withholding tax on the interest payments it received from the Harris ... Continue to full case
New Zealand vs BNZ Investments Ltd, July 2009, HIGH COURT

New Zealand vs BNZ Investments Ltd, July 2009, HIGH COURT

The case: Is each of six similar structured finance transactions entered into by the plaintiffs (the BNZ) a ‘tax avoidance arrangement’ void under s BG 1 Income Tax Act 1994? That is the primary issue in these five consolidated proceedings brought by the BNZ against the Commissioner, challenging his assessments issued after he voided each of the transactions pursuant to s BG 1. The BNZ claims the transactions are not caught by s BG 1. A second issue, arising only if s BG 1 applies, is the correctness of the way in which the Commissioner has, pursuant to s GB 1, counteracted the tax advantage obtained by the BNZ under the transactions. The Commissioner disallowed the deductions claimed by the BNZ, as its costs of the transactions. The BNZ claims the deductions should be disallowed only to the extent they are excessive or ‘overmarket’. A third, and perhaps strictly antecedent, issue is whether the guarantee arrangement fee (GAF) or guarantee ... Continue to full case