Tag: Business reasons

Test used in determining the economic substance of an arrangement/transaction. Artificial schemes which create circumstances under which no tax or minimal tax is levied may be disregarded if they do not have a “business rationale/-reason”. See also lack of economic substance.

Norway vs. IKEA Handel og Ejendom, October 2016, HRD 2016-722

Norway vs. IKEA Handel og Ejendom, October 2016, HRD 2016-722

In 2007, IKEA reorganised its property portfolio in Norway so that the properties were demerged from the Norwegian parent company and placed in new, separate companies. The shares in these companies were placed in a newly established property company, and the shares in this company were in turn sold to the original parent company, which then became an indirect owner of the same properties. The last acquisition was funded through an inter-company loan. Based on the non-statutory anti-avoidance rule in Norwegian Tax Law, the Supreme Court concluded that the parent company could not be allowed to deduct the interest on the inter-company loan, as the main purpose of the reorganisation was considered to be to save tax. The anti-avoidance rule in section 13-1 of the Tax Act did not apply in this circumstance. Click here for translation Norway vs IKEA-Handel-og-Ejendom-HRD-2016-722 ... Continue to full case
Nederlands vs. Corp, July 2011, Lower Court AWB 08/9105

Nederlands vs. Corp, July 2011, Lower Court AWB 08/9105

X is the holding company of the so-called A-group, which is a recreation company driven. The activities in X was taking out cancellation insurance. Within the group an Irish company was established. Between X and an insurer, that insurer and a reinsurer and the reinsurer and the Irish company several contracts were concluded with regard to the cancellation activities. The court considers that the tax administration has proved that X has let on un-businesslike grounds earnings miss in favor of the Irish company. Click here for translation Nederlands-vs-Corp-July-2011-Lower-Court-Case-nr-AWB-08-9105 ... Continue to full case
Netherlands vs Shoe Corp, June 2007, District Court, Case nr. 05/1352, VSN June 2, 2007

Netherlands vs Shoe Corp, June 2007, District Court, Case nr. 05/1352, VSN June 2, 2007

This case is about a IP sale-and-license-back arrangement. The taxpayer acquired the shares in BV Z (holding). BV Z owns the shares in BV A and BV B (the three BVs form a fiscal unity under the CITA). BV A produces and sells shoes. In 1993, under a self-proclaimed protection clause, BV A sells the trademark of the shoes to BV C, which is also part of the fiscal unity. The protection clause was supposedly intended to protect the trademark in case of default of BV A. Taxpayer had created BV C prior to the sale of the trademark. In 1994, the taxpayer entered into a licensing agreement with BV C: the taxpayer pays NLG 2 to BV C per pair of shoes sold. Next, BV C is then moved to the Netherlands Antilles, which results in the end of the fiscal unity as of January 1, 1994. The roundtrip arrangement, the sale of an intangible and the subsequent payment of ... Continue to full case
US vs. Medieval Attractions, 1996 October,

US vs. Medieval Attractions, 1996 October,

The United States Tax Court sustained the IRS determination that there were no arm’s-length business reasons why payments would have been made for the intangible property in question and therefore refused to allow those expenses to be included in the Section 482 calculation of net taxable income. US-MedievalAttractions_decision_10091996 ... Continue to full case