Tag: Economic ownership

Germany vs. Corp. September 2016, Supreme Tax Court IV R 1 14

Germany vs. Corp. September 2016, Supreme Tax Court IV R 1 14

Tax depreciation for wind turbines presupposes economic ownership of the asset. A change in economic ownership requires that any risks are transferred to the purchaser/customer. The German Supreme Tax Court held that economic ownership of an asset is not transferred at the time it generates income but rather when the risk of accidental destruction and accidental deterioration of the asset passes to the buyer. The contractual agreements to that effect are crucial. A German partnership (KG) operated a wind farm consisting of five wind turbines. Each wind turbine on a farm is a separate asset which is to be depreciated, or amortised, separately. In December 2003 the KG entrusted a GmbH with the turnkey construction of the turbines. The purchase price was payable in installments. The GmbH in turn engaged another company with delivery and installation of the wind turbines and also to take them into operation. According to the contract, the risk of accidental destruction and accidental deterioration of the ... Continue to full case
The Netherlands vs X BV, February 2004, Appellate Court of Amsterdam V-N 2004/39.9.

The Netherlands vs X BV, February 2004, Appellate Court of Amsterdam V-N 2004/39.9.

X BV, is member of the English XX-group. One of X’s parents is XX Ltd., based in the United Kingdom. In 1992, X BV acquired licensing rights relating to the trade name J from J Ltd. Their value was determined to be GBP 19.2 million. According to the agreement, X BV paid GBP 19 million for the ten-year economic ownership of the licensing rights. J Ltd. sold the legal ownership to W BV for GBP 200,000 in which X BV owned all shares. In 1996, X BV sells the ten-year economic ownership to W BV for GBP 2 million. To support the GBP 19 million price for the economic ownership, a valuation report is drawn up in 1992. The valuation is based on “projected royalty streams” which showed increasing royalty streams over the ten-year period 1992-2002. The tax authorities disagrees with the price of GBP 19 mio. and argue that the total value of the brand was GBP 43 mio ... Continue to full case