Tag: Interest limitation

The EU Anti Tax Avoidance Package - Anti Tax Avoidance Directives (ATAD I & II) and Other Measures

The EU Anti Tax Avoidance Package – Anti Tax Avoidance Directives (ATAD I & II) and Other Measures

Anti Tax Avoidance measures are now beeing implemented across the EU with effect as of 1 January 2019. The EU Anti Tax Avoidance Package (ATAP) was issued by the European Commission in 2016 to counter tax avoidance behavior of MNEs in the EU and to align tax payments with value creation. The package includes the Anti-Tax Avoidance Directive, an amending Directive as regards hybrid mismatches with third countries, and four Other measures. ATAD I The Anti-Tax Avoidance Directive (ATAD), COUNCIL DIRECTIVE (EU) 2016/1164 of 12 July 2016, introduces five anti-abuse measures, against tax avoidance practices that directly affect the functioning of the internal market. 1) Interest Limitation Rule  – Reduce profitshifting via exessive interest payments (Article 4) 2) Exit Taxation – Prevent tax motivated movement of valuable business assets (eg. intangibles) across borders (Article 5) 3) General Anti-Avoidance Rule (GAAR) – Discourage Artificial Arrangements (Article 6) 4) Controlled Foreign Company (CFC) – Reduce profits shifting to low tax jurisdictions (Article 7, 8) 5) Hybrid Mismatch Rule – ... Continue to full case
New Zealand introduces Group Rating Approach for certain Cross-Border relatet party Borrowing and Debt Arrangements

New Zealand introduces Group Rating Approach for certain Cross-Border relatet party Borrowing and Debt Arrangements

The OECD’s final report on interest limitation rules notes that thin capitalisation rules are vulnerable to loans with excessive interest rates and many transfer pricing practicioneres finds that transfer pricing may not the most effective way to prevent profit-shifting using high-priced related party debt. Related-party transactions are fundamentally different to third-party transactions. Factors that increase the riskiness of a loan between unrelated-parties (such as whether the debt can be converted into shares or the total indebtedness of the borrower) are less relevant in a related-party context. In New Zealand new rules on pricing of cross-border borrowing and debt has been implemented according to which interest deductions can be restricted. Questions asked under the new rules: Draft guidance on these rules was issued by the New Zealands Inland Revenue in August 2018. New Zealand 2018-sr-beps-interest-limitation ... Continue to full case
Germany vs. Corp. November 2015, Supreme Tax Court judgment I R 57/13

Germany vs. Corp. November 2015, Supreme Tax Court judgment I R 57/13

The Supreme Tax Court held – contrary to the finance ministry interest limitation decree – that the exception for interest payments to a significant shareholder of not more 10% of the company’s total borrowing cost applies separately for each shareholder, rather than to all significant shareholders cumulatively. There are a number of exceptions to the interest limitation rule essentially limiting the annual interest deduction to 30% of EBITDA as shown in the accounts. One of these is the equity ratio rule exempting a subsidiary company from the interest limitation provided its equity ratio (ratio of shareholder’s equity to the balance sheet total) is no more than two percentage points lower than that of the group and no more than 10% of its net interest cost was paid to any one significant shareholder (a shareholder owning more than 25% of the share capital). A loss-making company paying slightly less than 10% of its total net interest cost to each of two ... Continue to full case
Germany vs. Corp. October 2015, Supreme Tax Court decision I R 20/15

Germany vs. Corp. October 2015, Supreme Tax Court decision I R 20/15

The Supreme Tax Court has requested the Constitutional Court to rule on the conformity of the interest limitation with the constitutional requirement to tax like circumstances alike. The interest limitation disallows net interest expense in excess of 30% of EBITDA. However, the rule does not apply to companies with a total net annual interest cost of no more than €3 m or to those that are not part of a group. There are also a number of other exemptions, but the overall effect is to render the actual impact somewhat arbitrary. In particular, the asserted purpose of the rule – prevention of profit shifts abroad through deliberate under-capitalisation of the German operation – seemed somewhat illusory to the Supreme Tax Court in the light of the relatively high threshold and of the indiscriminate application to cases without foreign connotations. The court also pointed out that interest, as such, is a legitimate business expense and that the limitation rule can penalise ... Continue to full case