Tag: Interest rate

France vs SAS Wheelabrator Group, July 2019, Conseil d’Etat Opinion, No 429426

France vs SAS Wheelabrator Group, July 2019, Conseil d’Etat Opinion, No 429426

In an Opinion issued on 10 July 2019 on request from the Administrative Court of Versailles, the Conseil d’Etat states as a principle that the arm’s length nature of intra-group interest rate can be demonstrated by reference to comparable unrelated transactions, when these loans constitutes realistic alternatives to the intra-group loan. Excerpt from the Opinion “… 5. The rate that the borrowing enterprise could have obtained from independent financial establishments or organizations under similar conditions means, for the purposes of these provisions, the rate that such establishments or organizations would have been susceptible, account given its own characteristics, in particular its risk profile, to grant it for a loan with the same characteristics under arm’s length conditions. 6. This rate cannot, having regard to the difference in nature between a loan from a financial institution or body and financing by bond issue, be that which this enterprise would itself have been able to serve for subscribers if it had chosen to ... Continue to full case
Switzerland vs. A GmbH, 12 Sep. 2018, Administrative Court, Case No. SB.2017.00100

Switzerland vs. A GmbH, 12 Sep. 2018, Administrative Court, Case No. SB.2017.00100

A GmbH, based in Zurich, was a subsidiary of the D group operating mainly in the field of consumer electronics worldwide, headquartered in country E. A GmbH was primarily responsible for acquiring exploitation rights to … and other related activities. The D Group also owned company F in Land H, which was responsible for the global treasury and cash pooling of the Group. On December 1 2008 A GmbH had entered into an agreement with Company F for the short-term deposit of excess capital and short-term borrowing. Under the terms of the agreement, if the balance was in A GmbH’s favor, A GmbH would be credited interest based on the one-month London Interbank Bid Rate (LIBID) minus 6.25 basis points, but not less than 0.05%. Following an audit in relation to the tax periods of 1.4.2009-31.3.2010 and 1.4.2010-31.3.2011, the tax authorities took the view that the cash pool credit contains a proportion of long-term loans to company F and insofar ... Continue to full case
Norway vs. Exxonmobil Production Norway Inc., January 2018, Lagsmanret no LB-2016-160306

Norway vs. Exxonmobil Production Norway Inc., January 2018, Lagsmanret no LB-2016-160306

An assessment was issued by the Norwegian tax authorities for years 2009 2010 and 2011 concerning the interest on a loan between Exxonmobil Production Norway Inc. (EPNI) as the lender and Exxon Mobile Delaware Holdings Inc. (EMDHI) as the borrower. Both EPNI and EMDHI are subsidiaries in the Exxon Group, where the parent company is domiciled in the United States. The loan agreement between EPNI and EMDHI was entered into in 2009. The loan had a drawing facility of NOK 20 billion. The agreed maturity was 2019, and the interest rate was fixed at 3 months NIBOR plus a margin of 30 basis points. The agreement also contained provisions on quarterly interest rate regulation and a interest adjustment clause allowing the lender to adjust the interest rate on changes in the borrower’s creditworthiness. The dispute concerns the margin of 30 basis points and the importance of the adjustment clause, also referred to as the step-up clause. The Oil Tax office ... Continue to full case
Norway vs Hess Norge AS, May 2017, Court of Appeal

Norway vs Hess Norge AS, May 2017, Court of Appeal

A Norwegian subsidiary of an international group (Hess Oil), refinanced an intra-group USD loan two years prior to the loans maturity date. The new loan was denominated in Norwegian kroner and had a significantly higher interest rate. The tax authorities reduced the interest payments of the Norwegian subsidiary pursuant to section 13-1 of the Tax Act for fiscal years 2009 – 2011, thereby increasing taxable income for years in question with a total of kroner 262 million. The Court of Appeal found for the most part in favor of the tax administraion. Under the circumstances of the case, neither the claimed refinancing risk nor the currency risk could sufficiently support it being commercially rational for the subsidiary to enter into the new loan agreement two years prior to the maturity date of the original USD loan. When applying the arm’s length principle, the company’s refinancing risk had to be based on the Norwegian company’s actual situation as a subsidiary in ... Continue to full case
Switzerland vs. A GmbH, 7 Dec. 2016, Administrative Court, Case No. SB.2016.00008

Switzerland vs. A GmbH, 7 Dec. 2016, Administrative Court, Case No. SB.2016.00008

The distinction between cash pool receivables and long-term loans. A GmbH is a group company of the global A-group. The A Group also includes company F Ltd, which is responsible for the global treasury and cash pooling of the A Group. In 2008, A GmbH entered into an agreement with F Ltd on the short-term deposit of excess liquidity and short-term borrowing (cash pool). Under the terms of the agreement, if the balance were in A GmbH’s favor, recievables would be credited interest based on the one-month London Interbank Bid Rate (LIBID) less 6 , 25 basis points, but at least 0.05%. The Swiss tax administration argued that a portion of the cash pool receivable had to be treated as a long-term loan bearing higher interest rates. The long-term loan was set to the minimum cash pool receivable balance of each fiscal year. The interest rate on the long-term loan was set to the Swiss „Safe Habor Rates“ according to ... Continue to full case
Switzerland vs Corp, 16. Dezember 2015, Case No. SB-2015-00005

Switzerland vs Corp, 16. Dezember 2015, Case No. SB-2015-00005

A AG granted loans to group companies as part of a cash pooling system via the parent company. The Swiss tax administration found the interest insufficient, resulting in a hidden profit distribution. According to the Swiss rules and doctrine, transactions between related parties must be consistent with the arm’s length principle. For the third-party comparison, the Court relied on the long-term interest rates, even if the cash pool balances were correctly accounted for as short-term loans. The basis for the third-party comparison for the cash pool interest rate was determined to be the market interest rate measured on the 5-year SWAP rate. The Court decision was partial approval of A AG and refusal to the Tax administration. Click here for translation Swiss SB.2005.00005 ... Continue to full case
Switzerland vs Hotel X. SA, Nov. 2013, Courts of Switzerland, Case No. 2C_291 / 2013 / 2C_292 / 2013

Switzerland vs Hotel X. SA, Nov. 2013, Courts of Switzerland, Case No. 2C_291 / 2013 / 2C_292 / 2013

A loan was granted from a swiss company to its shareholder. The interest rate was fixed at 2,5%. This was found to be a hidden distribution of profit to the shareholder, cf Art. 58 al. 1 letter. b LIFD. Click here for english translation Hotel X vs switzerland ... Continue to full case
Denmark vs. Bombardier, October 2013, Administrative Tax Court, SKM2014.53.LSR

Denmark vs. Bombardier, October 2013, Administrative Tax Court, SKM2014.53.LSR

The issue in the case was whether the applicable rates under the cash pool arrangement were on arm’s length, i.e. in accordance with the transfer pricing requirements. The Administrative Tax Court upheld most of the conclusions of the tax authorities. First, the Court found that the tax authorities were allowed to assess an arm’s length rate due to the lack of transfer pricing documentation. Second, the financial service fee of 0.25% was upheld. Third, the Court concluded that the rate on the short-term deposits and the corresponding loans (borrowed due to insufficient liquidity management) should be the same. The Administrative Tax Court observed that there was very little or no creditor risk on these gross corresponding loans/deposits because of the possibility of offsetting the balance. Hence, according to the Court, there was no basis for a spread on the gross balance. However, the rate spread on the net balance of the deposits was lowered from +1.18% to + 1.15%, equal ... Continue to full case
France vs. France Immobilier Group, Nov. 2012, CE no 328670

France vs. France Immobilier Group, Nov. 2012, CE no 328670

In the France Immobilier Group decision, the Court found that the interest rate should be based on the financing conditions the lender could have obtained from a third-party bank. Click here for translation France vs. France Immobilier Group_07_11_2012_CE no 328670 ... Continue to full case
Korea vs Finance Corp, December 2010, Seoul High Court, Case No 2009누39126

Korea vs Finance Corp, December 2010, Seoul High Court, Case No 2009누39126

At issue in this case is the determination of arm’s length interest rates. Click here for translation 2009누39126 ... Continue to full case
Finland vs. Corp. November 2010, Supreme Administrative Court HFD 2010:73

Finland vs. Corp. November 2010, Supreme Administrative Court HFD 2010:73

A company, which belonged to a Nordic group, had until August 2005, two loans with an independent party outside the group. The interest of the loans was 3.135 to 3.25 percent. The company’s long-term loans amounted to over EUR 36 million and the guarantees granted by the Company for its loans amounted to about 41 million. In August 2005 the financing of the entire group was re organised. A Ltd paid off old bank loans and took up a new loan from the Swedish company B AB, which belonged to the group. For loans between the group companies was 9.5 percent interest rate. The interest rate had been affected by interest rate percentages on unrelated loans , risk loans and loans from shareholders. After the change in funding A Ltd’s long-term debt totaled just over EUR 38 million and the guarantees granted by the Company for the group was around 300 million euros. A Ltd’s capital structure was not affected ... Continue to full case
France vs. SOCIETE D'ACQUISITIONS IMMOBILIERES, Jan 2010, CE, No. 313868

France vs. SOCIETE D’ACQUISITIONS IMMOBILIERES, Jan 2010, CE, No. 313868

In the Société d’acquisitions immobilières case the interest rate charged to a subsidiary was considered comparable with the interest rate the French entity would receive from a third party bank for an investment similar in terms and risk. The Court decided that the cash advance granted by a sub-subsidiary to its ultimate parent with which it had no business relations could constitute an “abnormal act of management” if the amount lent is clearly disproportionate to the creditworthiness of the borrowing company. Click here for translation France vs SOCIETE D'ACQUISITIONS IMMOBILIERES 22 Jan 2010 CE no 313868 ... Continue to full case
France vs. Montlaur Sakakini, Oct 1995, CAA, No 95LY00427

France vs. Montlaur Sakakini, Oct 1995, CAA, No 95LY00427

In the case of Montlaur Sakakini the court concluded that the arm’s length interest rate is the rate that the lender could have obtained from a third party bank. The question of “ACTE ANORMAL DE GESTION” was also addressed in this case. Click here for translation MONTLAUR SAKAKINI du_5_février_1997_94LY00427_inédit_au_recueil_Lebon . . . Click here for translation MONTLAUR SAKAKINI_25_octobre_1995 CAA_94LY00427 ... Continue to full case