Tag: Manufacturing

Denmark vs Icemachine Manufacturer A/S, June 2020, National Court, Case No SKM2020.224.VLR

Denmark vs Icemachine Manufacturer A/S, June 2020, National Court, Case No SKM2020.224.VLR

At issue was the question of whether the Danish tax authorities had been entitled to make a discretionary assessment of the taxable income of Icemachine Manufacturer A/S due to inadequate transfer pricing documentation and continuous losses. And if such a discretionary assessment was justified, the question of whether the company had lifted the burden of proof that the tax authorities’ estimates had been clearly unreasonable. The Court ruled that the transfer pricing documentation provided by the company was so inadequate that it did not provide the tax authorities with a sufficient basis for determining whether the arm’s length principle had been followed. The tax authorities had therefore been entitled to make a discretionary assessment of the taxable income. For that purpose the Court found that the tax authorities had been justified in using the TNM method with the Danish company as the tested party, since sufficiently reliable information on the sales companies in the group had not been provided. Click here for ... Continue to full case
Poland vs Cans Corp, September 2019, Provincial Administrative Court i Szczecin, Case no SA/Sz155/19

Poland vs Cans Corp, September 2019, Provincial Administrative Court i Szczecin, Case no SA/Sz155/19

At issue in this case was the remuneration of a Polish manufacturing subsidiary in an international group dealing in the production and sale of metal packaging for food products, including beverage cans, food cans, household cans and metal closures. The tax authorities had issued an tax assessment for FY 2009 – 2012 based on a benchmark study. Decision of the Administrative Court The Court upheld the decision of the Tax and Revenue Office concerning income for the tax year from 01/01/2012 to 31/12/2012. In 2012, the Polish manufacturing site operated by producing lids for jars. In the course of the audit proceedings against the Party regarding corporate income tax for 2012, the first instance authority determined – based on a comparative analysis of the financial results of similar independent manufactures operating in the packaging industry on the market in Central and Eastern Europe, that this market showed an upward trend and in none of the years 2009-2012 this industry recorded ... Continue to full case
Poland vs Non-Woven z o.o., July 2019, Supreme Administrative Court, Case No II FSK 3433/18

Poland vs Non-Woven z o.o., July 2019, Supreme Administrative Court, Case No II FSK 3433/18

The question in this case was whether or not year-end-adjustments/profit adjustments should be considered part of the market price for acquisition of raw materials used in the production of non-wovens products in the Polish company operating partially under a tax exempt zone. The Court of First Instance had come to the conclusion, that the payment of year end adjustments were part of the price for acquisition of raw materials and thus not tax deductible as related to tax exempt activities. This decision was appealed by the company. The Supreme Administrative Court considered the following : The appeal should be upheld. It should be noted that one of the assumptions of transfer prices is respect for the so-called market price rules. It consists in the fact that when transactions are concluded by related entities , the agreed conditions should be consistent with the conditions applied in comparable transactions by independent entities. The means of implementing this principle are the so-called profitability ... Continue to full case
India vs. Fulford (India) Limited, July 2011, Income Tax Appellate Tribunal

India vs. Fulford (India) Limited, July 2011, Income Tax Appellate Tribunal

Fulford India Ltd. imported active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) from related group companies and sold them in India. The TNM method was used for determening transfer prices. The tax administration found the CUP method to be the most appropriate. Fulford India argued that the CUP method requires stringent comparability and any differences which could materially affect the price in the open market should be taken into consideration. In the pharmaceutical world, APIs whith similar properties may still be different in relation to quality, efficiancy, impurities etc. Therefore, the two products cannot be compared. In court, it was further explained that Fulford also performed secondary manufacturing functions, converting the APIs into formulations. Hence, Fulford could be descriped as a value added distributor. The Court concluded that the selection of the best method should be based on functional analysis and the characterisation of the transactions and the entities. The fact that Fulford had secondary manufacturing activities had not previously been explained to the ... Continue to full case
India vs. Maruti Suzuki India Ltd.

India vs. Maruti Suzuki India Ltd.

Maruti Suzuki India manufactures and sells cars and spare parts. A license agreement had been entered with the group parent for use of licensed information and trademark for the manufacture and sale of the products. Hence, Maruti Suzuki paid royalties to the parent for trademark and technology. The tax administration made an adjustment where the royalty paid for use of the trademark was disallowed and where a reimbursement with mark-up for non-routine advertising, marketing and promotion of the brand name was imputed. The High Court, referred the case back to the tax administration with observations. If there is an agreement between the group parent and the taxpayer which carries an obligation on the taxpayer to use the trademark owned by the group parent. Such agreement should be accompanied either by an appropriate payment by the group parent or by a discount provided to the taxpayer. Appropriate payment should be made on account of benefit derived by the group parent in the form of marketing intangibles obtained from such mandatory ... Continue to full case
France vs. Caterpillar, October 1989, CE No 65009

France vs. Caterpillar, October 1989, CE No 65009

In Caterpillar, a 5% royalty was found to be an arm’s-length rate for the manufacturing and assembling operations. The court did not accept that there should be different rates for the two different activities. Click here for translation France vs Caterpillar Oct 1989 CE No 65009 ... Continue to full case