Tag: Series of related-party transactions

Ideally, in order to arrive at the most precise approximation of arm’s length conditions, the arm’s length principle should be applied on a transaction-by-transaction basis. However, there are often situations where separate transactions are so closely linked or continuous that they cannot be evaluated adequately on a separate basis. TPG 3.9 – 3.12

Indonesia vs "Asian Agri Group", December 2012, Supreme Court, Case No. 2239 K/PID.SUS/2012

Indonesia vs “Asian Agri Group”, December 2012, Supreme Court, Case No. 2239 K/PID.SUS/2012

This case is about extensive tax evasion set up by the tax manager of the Asian Agri Group. According to the tax authorities income from export sales had been manipulated. Products were sent directly to the end buyer, whereas the invoices recorded that the products were first sold to companies in Hong Kong and then sold to a company in Macau or the British Virgin Islands before they were finally sold to the end buyer. The intermediary companies were proven to have been used only for the purpose of lowering the taxable income by under-invoicing the sales prices compared to the sales price to the end buyer. Various fees had also been deducted from the companies income to further lower the tax payment. These included a “Jakarta fee”, a Hedging fee and a Management fee. Judgement of the Supreme Court The court ruled that the tax manager was guilty of submitting an incorrect or incomplete tax return. On that basis ... Read more
Spain vs. Bicc Cables Energía Comunicaciones S.A., July 2012, Supreme Court, Case No. 3779/2009

Spain vs. Bicc Cables Energía Comunicaciones S.A., July 2012, Supreme Court, Case No. 3779/2009

In May 1997, BICC CABLES ENERGÍA COMUNICACIONES, S.A. acquired 177 class B shares in BICC USA Inc. (BUSA) for USD 175 million. The par value of each share was one dollar. The acquisition price of the shares was set on the basis of an Arthur Andersen Report which stated that the fair market value of BUSA was USD 423 million. BUSA was the holding company of four investee companies, so the valuation was made in relation to each of the groups of investee companies. The shares acquired by BICC CABLES were Class B shares, with a fixed annual dividend of 4.5% of the total investment. This dividend was paid, at BUSA’s discretion and in accordance with the agreements entered into between the parties, either in cash or by delivery of shares in the Class B company. The acquisition was financed by (1) Ptas. 3,450,000,000,000 charged to the unrestricted reserves account of BICC CABLES and (2) 22,000,000,000 pesetas through a loan ... Read more