Tag: Sales commissions

France vs. SARL SRN Métal, May 2021, CAA, Case No. 19NC03729

France vs. SARL SRN Métal, May 2021, CAA, Case No. 19NC03729

SARL SRN Métal’s business is trading in industrial metal and steel products. Following an audit of the company for FY 2011 to 2012 and assessment was issued related to VAT, Transfer Pricing and Withholding Tax. In regards to transfer pricing, the administration considered that (1) the sales of goods made by SRN Métal to B-Lux Steel, established in Luxembourg, were invoiced at a lower price than that charged to the company’s other customers and (2) that commissions paid to Costa Rica – a privileged tax regime – were not deductible as SRN Metal did not provided proof that the expenses corresponded to real operations and that they are not abnormal or exaggerated. The company requested the administrative court of Strasbourg to discharge the assessments. This request was rejected by the court in a judgement issued 29 October 2019. This decision of the administrative court was appealed by the company to the Supreme Administrative Court Judgement of the Supreme Administrative Court ... Read more
Tanzania vs Atlas Copco Tanzania Ltd., August 2020, Court of Appeal, Case No 167 of 2019, TZCA 317

Tanzania vs Atlas Copco Tanzania Ltd., August 2020, Court of Appeal, Case No 167 of 2019, TZCA 317

Atlas Copco Tanzania Ltd. is part of Atlas Copco Group, a conglomerate of multinational companies headquartered in Sweden. The group produces and sell compressors, vacuum solutions, generators, pumps, power tools etc. Apart from supplying generators in Tanzania on its own, Atlas Tanzania sold generators as an agent of its sister companies which had no presence in the country. For the latter type of sales, known as “indent sales”, Atlas Tanzania earned a commission. Being oblivious that the commission income attracted Value Added Tax (“VAT”), Atlas Tanzania did not file any VAT returns on indent sales until its external auditors, KPMG, informed it of the requirement. By then, Atlas Tanzania had posted in its sales ledgers commission income amounting to TZS. 134,413,682,281.00 for FY 2007 and 2008. Atlas Tanzania then accounted for VAT on the commission for the years 2007 and 2008 amounting to TZS. 5,692,574,000.00, which was paid through the VAT returns filed in 2009. This amount was much smaller ... Read more
Romania vs "Broker" A SRL, September 2016, Supreme Court, Case No 3818/2019

Romania vs “Broker” A SRL, September 2016, Supreme Court, Case No 3818/2019

Following an audit Broker A SRL was ordered to submit corrective statements on the corporate income tax for the tax years 2016 and 2017, and not to take over the tax loss from previous years, in the amount of RON 62,773,810 in 2016 and 2017. The tax authorities had found shortcomings in the comparability study drawn up by the company and replaced it with their own study. According to Broaker A SRL the transfer pricing adjustment was unlawful: the measure of reworking the comparability study has no legal basis and was not reasoned by the tax authorities; the findings of the tax inspection bodies are based on a serious error concerning the accounting recognition of A. BV’s income in its records; unlawfulness as regards the adjustment of income in respect of support services. ANAF has made serious errors of calculation by reference to its own reasoning in establishing the adjustments. unlawfulness of the tax decision in relation to the adjustment ... Read more

South Africa vs. Kumba Iron Ore, 2017, Settlement 2.5bn

A transfer pricing dispute between South African Revenue Service and Sishen Iron Ore, a subsidiary of Kumba Iron Ore, has now been resolved in a settlement of ZAR 2.5bn. The case concerned disallowance of sales commissions paid to offshore sales and marketing subsidiaries in Amsterdam, Luxembourg and Hong Kong. Since 2012, Kumba Iron Ore’s international marketing has been integrated with the larger Anglo American group’s Singapore-based marketing hub. The settlement follows a similar investigations into the transfer pricing activities of Evraz Highveld Steel, which resulted in a R685 million tax claim against the now-bankrupt company related to apparent tax evasion using an Austrian shell company between 2007 and 2009 ... Read more
France vs Reynolds Tobacco, Nov 1990, Administrative Court of Appeal, Case N° 89PA01172

France vs Reynolds Tobacco, Nov 1990, Administrative Court of Appeal, Case N° 89PA01172

In Reynolds Tobacco, the 2%-3% commission received was considered arm’s-length, even though competitors received 8% for providing similar services. The services provided by the French company were sufficiently different, and this justified the lower commission rate charged. Excerpt from the Judgement “...by virtue of a contract concluded between the two companies on 14 December 1976, Reynolds Tobacco France covers, on behalf of its parent company, the administrative costs entailed by its representation in France in return for a commission of 2 to 3% of the amount of sales; that by maintaining that companies with a similar or comparable activity are remunerated by a commission of the order of 8% without establishing that this rate remunerates services of the same nature, the administration does not provide proof of the transfer of profits that it alleges; that neither the fact that Reynolds Tobacco France considered renegotiating the terms of its contract with the German company, nor the fact that it considered increasing ... Read more
US vs First Security Bank of Utah, March 1972, US Supreme Court, Case No. 70-305

US vs First Security Bank of Utah, March 1972, US Supreme Court, Case No. 70-305

The banks were subsidiaries of a holding company that also controlled a management company, an insurance agency, and, from 1954, an insurance company (Security Life). In 1948, the banks began to offer to arrange credit life insurance for their borrowers, placing the insurance with an independent insurance carrier. National banking laws prohibited the banks from receiving sales commissions, which were paid by the carrier to the insurance agency subsidiary. The commissions were reported as taxable income for the 1948-1954 period by the management company. After 1954, when Security Life was organized, the credit life insurance on the banks’ customers was placed with an independent carrier, which reinsured the risks with Security Life, the latter retaining 85% of the premiums. No sales commissions were paid. Security Life reported all the reinsurance premiums on its income tax returns for the period 1955 to 1959, at the preferential tax rate for insurance companies. The tax authorities, pursuant to 26 U.S.C. § 482, determined ... Read more